Comparing and Contrasting The ACA and The AHCA

Comparing and Contrasting The ACA and The AHCA | AmericanHealthCareAct.com

The internet is flowing with rumors about the differences between the Affordable Care Act (ACA/Obamacare) and the American Health Care Act (AHCA/Ryancare/Trumpcare). Unfortunately, in today’s technological era you can’t believe everything you read. Some of it is mere guessing, and some is pure opinion. Do you know the facts?

Affordable Care Act

  1. Individual Mandate – People who can afford health care but do not purchase a plan will face a tax penalty.
  2. Coverage Mandate – Insurers are required to cover certain needs such as maternity care, prescription drugs, and mental health.
  3. Purchasing Power Those who buy through HealthCare.Gov receive a tax benefit. Only truly helps the lower class.
  4. Deductibles Those in the lower/middle class who purchase a silver plan will receive subsidies.
  5. Preexisting Conditions Forbids insurers from either turning people down or charging more for those with preexisting conditions.
  6. Age Discrimination Insurers can charge older adults up to three times more than younger adults to keep up with health needs.
  7. Medicaid – States who comply with the Medicaid expansion get matched federal funding regardless of the amount.
  8. Health Taxes – Insurers, medical manufacturers, and wealthy citizens pay more in health care taxes.

American Health Care Act

  1. Individual MandateThose who don’t have a plan will face a 30% premium increase for a year when they do purchase it.
  2. Coverage Mandate – States have control and have the option to scale back on what insurers must cover (doesn’t mean they will).
  3. Purchasing Power – Tax benefits based more on age than income; designed to help the middle class and lower class.
  4. Deductibles – Replaces subsidies with the ability to have bigger health savings accounts.
  5. Preexisting Conditions – States can use federal funds to help cover those with preexisting conditions so insurers have less risk.
  6. Age Discrimination Insurers can charge older adults up to five times more than younger adults to keep up with health needs.
  7. Medicaid – Instead of matching state funding, the federal government will give each state a fixed amount.
  8. Health Taxes – Health taxes will be more equalized, eliminating about $600 million in taxes over the next ten years.